3.7 out of 10

Eucla

Ranked 4th best suburb in South Eastern
-31.913306577092 126.602042652815
Great for
  • Neighbourly Spirit
  • Peace & Quiet
  •  
  •  
Not great for
  • Nightlife
  • Shopping Options
  • Eating Out
  • Gym & Fitness
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

Reviews

2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
2yrs+

"Great place to stop and revive"

On your journey from east to west Mundrabilla is 62 kilometres west of Eucla and is a very dry arid area which only averages about 6 inches of rain a year. South of Mundrabilla on the Great Australian Bight a small Rock Lobster industry has developed. There is no other industry so there is no work, schools, shopping facilities or housing. there is no real estate to be bought for hundrends of kilometres. Many travelers stop at the Mundrabilla Roadhouse which is open till midnight and reopens at 5.30 am, 7 days a week and offers meals, take always, cold drinks etc. The roadhouse has a reputation for having the cheapest fuel on the Nullabor. Also at Mundrabilla and attached to the roadhouse is the Mundrabilla bar which has lots of interesting pub memorabilia. The only accommodation here is at the roadhouse which has ensuite motel units as well as powered caravan sites and campsites. There are no real attractions at Mundrabilla as it is really a refueling or rest stop. For the adventurist type, the Great Australian Bight is just 20 kilometres to the south and Wanteen beach road offers the locals a fair fishing spot with some good catches a regular occurrence. You can also visit the Rock Lobster Receival depot and buy a fresh crayfish. Before leaving the main roads though it is advisable to get directions from the roadhouse proprietors and always let someone know where you are heading. Always read and obey all signs whilst travelling in this area for your own safety.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
2yrs+

"Important truck stop on Nullabor"

The name Eucla is said to come from the aboriginal word for bright and its original owners were the Marning Tribe and it was in 1877 that Ecula was first inhabited by Europeans when it was set up as a repeater station for the Overland telegraph. Only 13 kms from the South Australia/Western Australia boarder a tram line and jetty was built to help unloading supplies. Today the telegraph station ruins are said to be haunted by a ghost. Shifting sands over the years have consistently covered and uncovered these ruins in sands since a rabbit plague in the 1890’s ate out all vegetation causing sands to move. When crossing the Nullabor many people like to stop here and view the surrounding scenery. There is not a town as such with no shops suitable for local habitation and no houses to buy either. basically the area is only a stop over on your way to or from the west. You can stay at the Eucla Motel Hotel complex which apart from motel units has a caravan and camping ground as well of course a petrol station. The Amber Motel is a modern building and has great facilities for the passing tourist and includes a restaurant but the adjoining caravan park does not have any overnight vans for hire. The BP Travellers Village petrol station provided fuel, oil, cold drinks and snacks for the journey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
2yrs+

"Ideal rest stop withlong history"

Madura is a roadhouse located 115 kilometres west of Mundrabilla and around 1876 was a pastoral homestead and for many years bred both polo and cavalry horses for the British. During the Second World War Madura was used by the army engineers who were sent out to upgrade the now Eyre Highway. Today, this tiny town is known mainly for sheep grazing and the roadhouse which services travelers heading across the country. Aprat from the sheep grazing there is nothing else here and no real estate for sale. there are no eductional institutions, shopping or medical facilities, making this an unsuitable area to want to live. Situated at the bottom of the Hampton Tablelands this is a scenic area and in addition to fuels, food and drinks the Madura Roadhouse has a great complex with motel style units, caravan and camping facilities as well as a swimming pool to cool off in and a licensed restaurant. A few kms west of the roadhouse is a beautiful lookout offering some great views of Madura Pass and the Roe Plains. It is amazing to think that this area was once a seaside area. Other attractions in the area are interesting old blowholes. These can be found by markers on the roadside. These blowholes are not overly spectacular anymore but do give and insight into the changes that have taken place over thousands and thousands of years. Just as a tip, there are not many 24 hour service stations on the Nullabor although there is one at Border village 189 kms east and one at Caiguna 147 kms west so if you intend to travel at night be sure to fill up.
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
2yrs+

"Eyre Bird Observatory - Ideal place to sty and learn"

About 50 kms to the southeast of Cocklebiddy is the Eyre Bird Observatory which is totally remote being only 1 km from the Great Australian Bight. Original names the “Sandpatch” because of earlier exploration the Eyre Telegraph Station was a major repeater station by the 1897 Transcontinental Telegraph network. After it ceased operation is was abandoned and then restored by Birds of Australia and the Post office Historical Society and renamed the Eyre Bird Observatory. The area is surrounded by the Nuytsland nature reserve and is home to over 240 birds some of which are rare and endangered. Travevllers will enjoy a rest stop here and the observatory runs educational courses for people interested in environmental protection etc. You cannot drive all the way the Eyre Bird observatory in a regular car and those not in possession of a four wheel drive can arrange to be picked up and dropped up by observatory wardens and staff. A bus service operates from Cocklebiddy Roadhouse where enquiries should be made. Fees are charge for the bus pick up service as well as for day visits. The Eyre Bird Observatory also has overnight accommodation but booking are advisable as it can sometime become rather busy. Unless employed by the proprieters of the Observatory there is no other industry here and as it is surrounded by natioanl park there is nom private real estate available and with no other facilities and infastructure, it would not be an ideal place to settle.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
2yrs+

"A township in a place of need. If you come from the west you are glad to see Eucla."

The first time I ever crossed the Nullarbor Plain was in a mini, with every spare space packed with gear, AND the Nullabor was unsealed at the time. Some of the pot holes were so big that the mini could disappear in them if you were not careful. Not only that, when driving at night some of those male kangaroos stood taller than the car!

When we hit Eucla, just on the western side the SA border, it was 9pm at night and we could not get any accommodation. A hint, even today if you want accommodation on the trip across the Nullabor, book it ahead. Let's face it, not many people stay more than one night in Eucla.

It is a small town, no amend that to tiny town!

There are some stunning things to see in Eucla though and one of them is a clear view of the Great Australian Bight. As you cross the Nullabor you can look out and see the Bight because everything is so flat but there is virtually no access to it at that stage.

What it does have at night though is a crowd of people celebrating because they have either made it from the west, or they are heading out the next day to cover the 700 odd kms to Norseman.

Enjoy it as you pass through.
Recommended for
  • Professionals